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Death of a Soul: labels & Classifications


The only analogy I could come up with to describe what I’m about to blog about are Darwin’s Finches. In nature the evolutionary cycle is amazing. Two finches of the same species with similar sized beaks existing in the same space can have a negative or a positive evolutionary affect on each other; in one instance one of the finch’s beaks shorten while the other one lengthens, and as a result of this both lose the ability to feed from the same food source – they must part ways and find other suitable food sources.




However, in the human world where different cultures, and even languages, bare an enormous effect on people, the affect is nearly the same, only in this instance humans do not necessarily feed from the same well of knowledge and understanding. One culture or behavior pattern completely dies while the other one thrives, such is the case with numerous women I’ve met.    When you mix a culture a part of each of them dies, and or rediscovered years later.   Many young Japanese feel that they need to redefine their cultural identity through travel and through the acquisition of English skills for their in order to attain meaning and substance in life.   And that by doing this they can improve their lives through social interactions with non-Japanese who have very different cultural backgrounds.




 
The slang term called Kokojology( there is no such term in the literary world), but for the sake of this post I will use it and try to define it my way.   Koko means black in rough Japanese slang, and Jo means woman, thus kokojo refers to Japanese women who love black dick, namely military types and thugs.  It doesn’t end there though, there are more names to throw around and even more classifications like barbies( Japanese who love white men). Kokojo/barbies represent for me a tragedy in how low a Japanese woman can go when they've  become too overly obsessed with black/white culture that they lose all sense of what her original purpose.    In other words, her common sense and her morality.



Take “Special K", for example, a very attractive and beautiful woman in her late forties. Single mother of three; black male father(s) unknown; works at a convenience store; no support, and doesn’t care.   Or take Noriko, living in Vegas for the last 28 years, four kids; widowed; corn roles; ghettofabulous; bad mouth; horrible teeth; no recollection about her experience as a Japanese. Smokes, watches American football all day. Skin and bones! A walking heat mine(a person known to have STD’s).




I’ve met so many Japanese women who were filled with hate of their own country, language, and culture. I digress, I occasional have beef with my own people too, but I don’t hate what we are or what we represent in the world.  I have disagreements and misunderstandings amongst my own people, but I don’t hate them and I don’t hate our music,culture and even language(ebonics). Disagreements, yes, things I’d like to see us do as a people is only something I could hope for.




The one thing these two women have in common, I’m only naming two now, is their total disconnect with Japan, its customs, and even language. They find total freedom in being completely (un)Japanese and shun anything that resembles Japanese culture and history. It makes them feel good that they can do this, but at the same time they feel a sense of hopelessness because of loss of identity…i.e. they can never be completely accepted into Western society without first  being identified as a Japanese, same for Westerners living in Japan. No matter how Japanese many of us foreigners are we can never be accepted into Japanese society completely.




In the case of Darwin’s Finches two birds of the same species were able to survive because one migrated and the other one stayed, and/or because they were able to find alternative food sources. This is natural. What is accomplished here by evolution is that both birds expand the species and make it more diverse while retaining the same qualities and traits associated with the species. Same cannot be said for human beings where the survival of one is dependent on the death of another ….i.e. you can’t be half saint and half devil, one feature has to completely die while the other lives.  Noriko and Special K have completely left the nest and have never returned.  They cannot live within themselves, and have not expanded their cultural parameters to reflect something even closely resembling their national identity.




There will always be an East vs. West fundamentalist world view. There will never be a third fundamental unifying world order and dogma that’s preached about in some secular religions. It’s not human nature. The roots of Western fundamentalism is centered around the individual whereas Eastern fundamentalism is centered around family, filial pity, and society(selflessness).



Many Japanese women see strength and independence in Western women, but often times find that their own culture doesn’t balance well with it. They try to extract what they see as positive in Western women and then apply it to being Japanese and fail so miserably. They soon learn that they have to give up a lot more, and often times it means selling out completely.



 Often times I’ve used the term Jukujo through-out my blog to signify ripe Japanese women in their late years. For me, I feel that I have grown tremendously in terms of how I look at the world, and even my own introspection through my experience with these women. I’ve come to learn how to appreciate the very littlest of things and cherish those things through my interactions with these women.



Not all older women can be classified as Jukujo though! Noriko and Special K are the best example for this.  Why?  Because they were never able to attain a balance between East and West.   A refined person, man or woman, know where their center is, and can draw from other cultures for inspiration and self improvement.  There is always a balance there, like when Darwin's finches expand their species through migration, so to the refined Jukujo who take the very best qualities and expands upon them through international travel and self exploration.

 I have met more she-devils who were in their 30s and 40s than young women. It only takes one diamond in the rough to affect change in one human being's life for a lifetime.   It only took one to change my life, and then subsequently more later on. It takes a certain quality and maternal instinct to quality as such. There is nothing wrong with this quality at all because both parties can benefit from nurturing. This for me is natural. Human interaction should be mutually beneficial where both souls and can thrive and feed off of each other, and hopefully create something that’s beautiful and wonderful. I choose to expand others, like the finches, with my knowledge and experience. Westerners shouldn’t praise a Japanese woman because of her Western(ness), and vise versa. Instead the two should seek to create a more perfect union through these differences in order to bring about something more beautiful, not less Japanese.

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