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From the Desk of McAlpine: Frugal Living

The future.  What is this urgency that people have within themselves to worry about the future?   If I ask myself this question, then I'd probably retort by saying " the future is now."  My girlfriend's friends have all become mothers and are all married to painfully average men.  And my gf envies them because she feels she's missing out on something.   She feels that her future is in jeopardy because she's waiting too long to settle down in order to be like them.  I say the hell with them!

 

"Dincom," or double digit income is arguably the best way to live in any society.  She and I have talked about this.  We talked about it over lunch in Shizuoka months ago.  I told her that our lifestyle is to be envied by all.  I mean, let's face it.  We can go anywhere we want, and do whatever we want and never have to worry about anything.   If an urgent financial issue arises all of a sudden  because of some unforeseen crisis or situation,  we know that as long as we have each other we can overcome any financial hardship.  Why?  Because we work together! 
There's no frugal living here.  There's no penny pinching.  She works and I work.  She brings home the dough, baby.  I work and bring home the bacon, too.  She's not a sit-at-home wife/girlfriend, neither is she a part-time worker or part of a temp. staff where she's making below a descent wage.  Life is hard. 

 

When I first moved to Japan, I coaxed her into quitting her job after she had gotten sick.  I convinced her that I could use the rest of my savings that I had brought over from the States to support us for about 3 months, and that during that time I would put her through a rigorous and intensive training course in how to conduct herself during a job interview in English.  I groomed her well and within a few short months she was on her way to  a successful career in property management.     I successfully managed to get her out of the food service industry and into a completely different career that had very lucrative benefits.  And then my job took off and we started making real money together.

 

In the age when my father and mother first met, it was the man's duty to pay for everything.  Why?  Because women back in those days  were discriminated against in the workplace.  They were paid meager wages and held low positions because of their gender.  Of course men were the bread winners, so it was only common sense for a man to foot the bill on dates.  Times have changed.  I think it's time we change with the Times.

 

Those few short months were tough,though, but I was adamant about her not working until  her physical condition improved.  I remember when I was in Roppongi a Japanese yakuza approached me and ask me how much I would sell him my bracelet for.  " A hundred bucks," I said.   It was just a cheap Italian charm bracelet,so I sold it to him.   I asked him for his business card in return and I told him that I would be getting in contact with him in the next 24 hours. 

 

I called him and gave him an account number where I wanted money deposited.  Of course he was dumbfounded!  "money!" ' for what?"  I told him that I was willing to offer 24 - hour interpreter services at a cost of 30,000 yen for 30 minutes( $350.00), and that if he needed this service call  anytime.  I hung up the phone.  Within hours the phone began ringing off the hook.  Within a couple of weeks our bank account swelled to six digits.  We were getting calls at 2a.m., sometimes during lunch, too.  I remember we were behind on some bills and we needed a new computer, then out of the blue the phone would ring.  She would interpret over the phone for thirty minutes and make a whopping 200,000!  It got crazy for awhile because as his business picked up, so did our money.

 

The point I am making here is that you need to be resourceful.  Use your resources.  I used to make my girlfriend bring me new private students from her job and make tons of money off of them.  Don't cut back on all the fun you can have here in Japan because you wanted to come over here poor! Or marry some lame excuse for a Japanese woman who probably doesn't even drink nihonshu or reverence the Emperor or who's probably lazy and lethargic!   That's pretty fucking stupid. 

 

You have no money  because you are not resourceful.  Think about it, where else in the world can you go and get paid what’s equivalent to $50.00 to teach English at a coffee shop with a beautiful girl??  You are getting paid for talking to a gorgeous lady in your own native tongue!  I have made tons of money off of freelancing private English lessons.  Sometimes I laugh to myself when I’m walking over to the bank, why?  Because I know….Only in Japan baby!

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