Skip to main content

What's Wrong with your Tongue?

 

I wish I could remember her name....oh...Ayako.   This string bean bikini(skinny Japanese girl) pulls me over to the side today to tell me how much she disliked one of  my choices in restaurants.  The restaurant I recommended to her was  in her own city and was even popular amongst the locals there, except her!

 

 

There's a place in Odawara, a micro urban city located on the outskirts of Kanagawa Prefecture, where there's a  type of hidden gem of a restaurant called Sanpei( san-pay), which specializes in Western style fried chicken.   It's rare to see such a place offering such a food dish like oily super crispy fried chicken, especially in the land of wabi-sabi and healthy food where anything oily gets condemned as junk food.

 

 

When I think of American-style fried chicken, words like crispy, juicy, oily, and salty spring to mind.  Sanpei's fried chicken is that, plus more!  It's really one of kind and a refreshing blast from the past when sinking my teeth into each and every bite.  Only true food geeks would travel as far as Odawara just to eat this chicken.  The only way to get here is by car!

 

 

At Sanpei, they have their own farm where they raise chicks up until they turn 3 or 4 month old, butcher them, halve them and prep them, then flour and fry them to order, nothing is pre-cooked, everything is  made to order. 

 

 

How I stumbled across this joint was through several popular food magazines that showcased this restaurant as having a very unique and flavorsome kind of chicken.   So, knowing me, the onsen, food, and sake geek I took a trip down there and went to heaven.  Luckily for me, since Hakone is just next door to Odawara,  made it even more appealing to even drive down  there.  I have since taken a couple of females there on two separate occasions  to enjoy a nice onsen and then a sumptuous chicken dinner.   All of them liked it and still crave more of it to this day.

 

 

Throngs of people fill this place up almost every night it seems, and they sell out of chicken almost every night.  So many people love this little joint that serves this super delicious and super crispy and super oily fried chicken.  Yes, it's the most oily fried chicken I have had since living in Japan, but it's damn good.

 

Just cause' this lady is underfed and unhealthy and who is super silly and super sensitive to oily food doesn't mean the chicken was bad.  Some oily foods taste good, fried chicken is one of them, she either  needs a tongue transplant or maybe a head check-up.    Bottom line is is that people eat all different types of food, some healthy, some not healthy.  Many oily foods like pizza and chicken just taste plain old good just as they are, oily.

 

I look at the numbers, I look at the people, I look at the ratings, I see the lines and the repeat customers who come back again and again.  People from Odawara and further north come from far and wide to enjoy this chicken. 

 

Ayako then comes back and offers me a recommendation for a chicken dish called chicken nanban チキン南蛮, which she claims tastes better than my recommendation, here:

Now, chicken nanban is a local favorite of Kyushu  and Miyazaki prefectures whereas Sanpei's chicken is an experiment in eclecticism by not following  traditional styles of cooking.   The two dishes simply cannot be compared; one is a regional favorite and the other one is a Western concoction that  wound up tasting very good.

 

In the video you can see a decent spread.  All of the little dishes were excellent and so was the chicken nanban!  I also ordered  some nihonshu.  The sake in the vid is called Tsurugi 剣 and it's brewed by Hou Biden of Tochigi prefecture.  It was a super dry 辛口 type and it complemented the juiciness in the the chicken and the yoghurt sauce that was used as a topping over the chicken.   All-and-all, a nice dish.  I would definitely recommend it. 

 

There's a place in the Collette-Mare in Sakuragicho that sells chicken nanban called gin no tsubura or 銀のつぶら on the sixth floor.  No English is spoken.  The set  I ordered in the vid was a lunch set, sake was additional, so I wound up paying 1800 yen for lunch and was very satisfied.   Sanpei's for maniacs who like bold and heavy tastes like myself. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Shin-Okubo: Little Korea

So I finally got around to going up there to Shin-Okubo,  the land of Seoul via the Yamanote Line.  Been putting this trip off for years for personal reasons;  I am not a fan of Hanlleyu.      I knew why I came up this way, and for none other reason than the food, and maybe to bask in the nausea of Korean romanticist who steal Japanese Jukujo's souls.    But honestly, I like spicy food and stews and pickled vegetables that challenge my taste buds.    I also love the little funky cafes that line the main thoroughfares and alley ways, each with their own little eclectic menus and interior decor.     This place is Korea.  





Shin-Okuba represents more than just a place to relish in Korean culinary delights and K-pop culture, but a place where Koreans can express themselves through their culture.    You can feel the local vibe in the air as you're walking down narrow walkways and footpaths.    I have personally been to mainland Korea six times, so a lot of the nostalgia was there …

August: The Return of Souls

August is peak summer season in Japan.  We can look forward to some of the most spectacular fireworks displays and festivals in the world, especially  in places like Tohoku and Kanto regions.  August is also  the most contentious month of the year in Japan; with the end of the war and war-related guilt.    Then there's the great exodus back home for millions of Japanese.   Obon season is what it's called in Japan, and it's  where families return to their hometowns to remember their ancestors and to spend time with loved ones.  Gravestones are visited, cleaned, and washed; rice or alcohol is often placed on  miniature altars next to a  headstone.  This is a way for Japanese to reconnect with their roots; a way for them to stay grounded and founded in the ways of tradition and cultural protocol.   

For the foreign tourist, some places will be overcrowded and expensive to reach; for Japanese, this is normal and can't be helped.   Wherever you go there will be lines and h…

Japan Board of Education: Amazing Grace...?

Japan Board of Education Textbook.
Amazing Grace
Shuken Shuppan  Polestar textbook English Communication

Preface:  Japanese / Japan is  one of the leading donors in humanitarian aid around the world.   They have donated billions of yen to charities, developing countries, and startup business to just about every country on the globe.  Some Japanese have even taken matters to the extreme  to the point of poking their noses into hotspot areas like Palestine and Isreal, things the Japanese may want to avoid.  Had Japan shared its borders with an ethnic minority with its own government, the relative peace and calm of this country would be questionable.   No other country can be like nor emulate Japan.   So, where does this spirit of charity and altruism come from exactly?   Why do the Japanese feel they need to save the whole world, while caring very little for its own people?   It's the Board of Education...?  The essay below is one such example of what Japanese kids learn in school,…