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Rant for the Nation



     [ Theme music  for this post is best enjoyed with stereo headphones :  Relax by Liquid Mind     Experience: Teach me to Whisper ]







First, let's start with the new Jukujo I met.   Her name is Shimizu-san.   Our meeting occurred on the morning of Feb. 10th at 9:30 at the Yokodai Station.    It was a brisk morning.   Since I had 25 minutes to kill I headed over to the Doutours next to the station for a cup of coffee.   I eyeball all the granny candy upon entering  the shop first.   Making sure to rub my shoes on the rug at the entrance, I remove my hat and gloves.    I approach the register and order up a medium blend.    As my coffee is being prepared I look over my shoulder and see a fairly decent looking Jukujo in her mid 40s....?   I smile.  She returns a smile.   " I'm in," I say to myself.    Collecting my coffee I headed over to where she was sitting and asked if I could have the seat next to her.   She obliged.   I sat.   I took the first nose flaring eye squinting sip.   I exhaled.   I caught my breath.     Rolled my eyes over to her and said " Hi" in a low baritone.  She laughed.      





My first impressions of her left me wondering if I wanted to invest a lot of energy into trying to get her, since she lacked the momma appeal I so love in the classical Jukujo face.     Shimizu was too swank and experienced looking.    I've never been into widow types.   Her husband passed and so she was desperate and lonely looking, yet she had many friends and there was something about her air that left me feeling suspicious and uneasy feeling.    Within 15 minutes we exchanged numbers and e-mail addresses.   Another thing was the way she chewed her gum.   Gum and coffee don't mix, plus the chewing and talking didn't jive well with me.   Too cheap looking.    She told me she was a diabetic and that she had to see the doctor that day for a follow up.     Here, here, and here, are posts I have written up describing what a Japanese Jukujo is supposed to be.     Shimizu is just  an old tired lady,  not a Jukujo which in my vernacular is  the epitome of Japanese feminine belle.    This is the fourth Jukujo I had walked away from.   The last one was that idiot Christian at McDonalds.   Avoid them like the plague.   



("The spiritual core of every Jukujo is reverence for the ancient gods of Shinto and Buddhism.   If they are Christians they are trash, period.   Japan is not a Christian nation.   It is not a white nation, either.   I will  fight you Christians wherever you hide and skulk around.    Leave the Japanese alone.  They have their own Gods. ") 




Next up we have Harumi, a t.v. personality here in Japan who's famous for making eclectic dishes that are supposed to be healthy.   She's been at it for years and every time I watch her on the telly my skin crawls.    She's flat as a pancake and dangerously anorexic looking.  No sex appeal.    The camera in HD picks up everything, even her veins in her spindly little fingers and hands.  Not appealing at all.     She makes it a point to speak English on her shows, only.   Why?  I do not know.   Maybe she has too much pride, or she wishes to appear sophisticated.   In reality she comes off sort of bitchy, moody, and pushy.    Not charming, and definitely not sophisticated.   What's funny is back in 2008 when my books were selling at Yurindo the store had stocked them next to Harumi's books....hahaha... I would not be trying to promote her as the de facto Betty Crocker of Japanese cuisine.   No way!   Too skinny, too unattractive, and not enough bust.    Bring a real Japanese woman on the show there with some style and some panache who's lovely to look at, not a starving for attention little eyesore of an old woman.   





Recently, doctors in Kyoto have discovered a fat burning protein that can reduce obesity.   I can see the government forcing food companies to modify their products with this new protein in a few years.   Government intervention should have boundaries.  I do not need the government  telling me what I can or cannot eat, or even worse forcing food companies to add unatural and modified  proteins to my diet.    Eating what I want is a basic human freedom.    At least we can all agree on that, right?   Japanese women must bulk up!




Lastly, Fukushima, here, here, is still receiving a lot of negative press.    I have mentioned again and again that Fukushima and Chernobyl should not be compared.   There are no radiation related deaths since March 11, 2011.    Nobody has died because of radiation.  The same cannot be said for victims of Chernobyl where many died within the first year.   With just that fact alone this comparison between the two incidences is mute.    The Japanese are working the problem and are steps away from a cold shut down.   Exports will begin to pick up little by little and the people of Tohoku will recover from this.    





The single biggest threat facing Tohoku is Billy Graham and his Christian crusade in the mask of charity outreach.   He will do more harm and more damage by bringing his mission to Sendai.    Give the charity but keep your religion out of Japan!    The Japanese do not need it.   They have their own spiritual institutions.    Earthquakes and tsunamis are natural occurrences all over the world, not divine retribution visited upon a helpless people.    The Western god did not cause this earthquake to happen, you fuckwit!    All Japan needs to do is do things the Japanese way.    If you want to donate then donate money, money, money.     Leave your white gods and santa clauses in the closet and stop trying to deceive  the good people of Tohoku with your smile, curly hair, and white skin.   



On a final note:  

China's vice President Xi Jiping has recently wrapped up a US visit with heads of state, business, and President Obama.   I think the visit went well, but one thing that caught my attention is when he made a comment regarding foreigners.    Something along the lines of " when foreigner have adequate food and shelter they wish to criticize the government!"   This is so true, even here in Japan.    All of the well paid and comfortable white foreigners complain endlessly about their right to entitlements and benefits.   And it's these same people who get noticed and published in major newspapers.    All they do is spread their dissatisfaction and hatred, and indifference.    But when somebody sticks up for the country and speaks against the foreign majority his voice rarely gets heard.    What the hell has happened to the media?

  



Comments

  1. It was good article I read as I am near you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I liked your visit, also I passed Yokodai Station last year.:)

    ReplyDelete

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