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Bondage and Torture

Was in a remote shoot location in southern Tokyo tonight at a special invite by a large group of professional Japanese photographers.  On show was something called "Baku - Manngekyou" which translates to,  Baku " arrest or bind "  and Manngekyou " Kaleidoscope".     So basically bondage and costume play with a very erotic twist.  The participants are all in their twenties and in the adult entertainment industry.  I accepted the invitation in order to explore the world of bondage play from the perspective of the camera man.  For those of you who know my genre, know that I am the quintessential  Japanese mommas-boy geek; a person with a severe mother complex for the Japanese Jukujo, so this genre with bondage play is totally alien to me.


I have to say that the expose of beauty and pain, and humiliation was absolutely  bizarre for me.    It was almost ceremony like from the way each model was tied and slung up and around on slings, to the hot candle wax and screams in between performances.    The whole thing was lured and shrouded in mystery.   I was drawn in to  a world I have never been to before.    I was snared.    

I was given a set of very difficult to understand instructions that led me to an old abandoned hospital in a remotely located area on the south side of Tokyo.   I didn't like the idea from the start, especially since I'd be the only foreigner  there.    

Down this long corridor there were rooms where models posed for shots and to sell their videos, sign autographs and speak with photographers.     I was nervous the whole time because so much was going on and I didn't quit know what to do and where to go.    Luckily I knew one of the porn star who immediately recognized me from an old photo shoot and came to my rescue.    She showed me around and told me to relax and enjoy the shoot and that she'd be performing shortly on the first floor.   

The way the system works is that you purchase a DVD from the actual actress in the DVD, then you get to do a 3 minute freestyle photo shoot with her or of her.    There are about 6 or 7 live shows on the first floor, so in between live shows you can come up and pose with the models, buy  memorabilia and chit chat with them.   
Akiba Cute Star is seen here holding the 1000 yen DVD.    She was approachable, thick and had a bubbly personality so I shot her in many different positions to get warmed up.  
 And then I shot Ema.  She posed wonderfully.   I used the pancake 40mm from Canon on this shot.     There were more!   This got my juices flowing.


Japanese bondage could be considered a part of Japanese culture.   It has its origins  in a traditional Japanese martial art called  Hojojutsu, the ancient practice of restraining a person using rope or cord.   
Later on it evolved into another art form called kinbaku-bi, which means " the beauty of tight binding!"
The foundation of any Kinbaku is the binding of the arms  behind the back.


Here the gentleman demonstrates a very basic loop bind with a very leggy model for the photographers.  There were strobes in the room so we didn't need to use flash.    The two models were amateurs and are not scheduled to debut until September.   This was an easy and light demonstration.   The next demonstration was done my a professional and was hauntingly beautiful.


A key point to remember is that the difference between Western BDSM and Japan is that here it's an art form where the tier uses  rope as a means to communicate to his victim.   

The practitioner or Bakushi  was amazing.   Every move and every tie was smooth and effortless, and masterful.  He knew right where to tie each binding in order to maximize the effect.  He  maintained control throughout the whole performance and made eye contact with the model for control.    The musical score being played in the background was called Suspiria by Argento Vivo - Goblin.   The music and these scenes only added to the tension.  



Control

I don't know how to describe what was going through my mind when I was watching this.   The red stuff across her thigh is hot wax, actually.   The whole mood was emotional, yet beautiful.   I was impressed.
It's not uncommon for BDSM actresses  to have an emotional release afterwards.    Tears are an affirmation that the art of kinbaku was performed properly, and that the actress has completely yielded to the master.   It's a none verbal form where the twine is manipulated and pulled in a way to communicate with the actress .  She has to yield and not resist or the pain will increase.  At one point,  I shot video footage of this demonstration in five segments where the master jumps on the binding with all of his body weight and swings with her.  There was visible pain and discomfort but I think this is what BDMS is about, an emotional release.     


On  a final note:

After watching something like this I felt that my own erotic world was so small.    One of my ex-gf had some experience in this area, think.  I remember she used to ask me to choke her, and I never understood why.    The more I study the behavior of these actresses and how they respond to pleasure and pain thresholds that more I understand, but little by little.    In college I had a Japanese gf who used to slap  me in the face frequently for no reason.    She kicked me in the nuts sometimes and I would ask "why?" She would just laugh it off.     If you want to try something bizarre then there's plenty of stuff to get into here in Tokyo.   I've grown tremendously here in this country.  


Welcome to Japan.

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