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Drink your Herbs: Shiso






The taste of summer is always delicious to the senses.   It's that time of year where its muggy and you need a drink to help you mellow out under the shade with the fellas.   A good Heineken usually does the trick, or maybe even a malt liquor or a tall boy.    But a liquor?   That's the sweet stuff usually reserved for girls, isn't it?   What about Boone's Farm, that stuff that isn't actually wine, but more of a 'near wine' like a near beer and that comes in assorted flavors and colors - food coloring?    There is no shortage of the strange concocted drinks that flood American liquor stores and the list continues.   How about Patron XO Cafe, a tequila with a coffee essence?



Here in Japan such experiments with the elixir continue, but albeit with a more natural twist that's neither pervasive nor overdone.   Just a novelty drink that nobody really takes seriously but fun to geek out on at fancy dinner parties.   A good key point to remember is that liqueur is not nihonshu.    The Shiso liqueur is a drink that's supposedly  suitable for fatigue and exhaustion.    The  ruby red color represents good fortune and happiness.  It goes on sell July 23rd. from a variety of sake outlets.   Fukuchitose Shiso Liquor


What is Shiso anyway?

It's a Japanese culinary herb.   In English it can be referred to as Perilla, but nobody calls it that - shiso is shiso.   It's classified under the mint family.   It's usually used at sushi bars and as a container for wasabi.   Some patrons actually eat it.     Shiso comes in two colors; red and green.   The red is called "akajiso" and is used for coloring pickled plums.   Most people identify this as umeboshi, the sour stuff in the Japanese bento boxes the obachaans ask you to eat.



If I were to offer up a real summer sake, one that is full of character and panache then go here  







Comments

  1. Is it like Wasabi sauce? Wasabi is very hot sauce.

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  2. OMG This sounds so good. I want some right now. I wonder if someone can tell me if this is available in the US or if it will be avail. I am going to go to my favorite japanese place tomorrow since its Friday night and ask for this. I hope they have it - because I need to try this !

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  3. I'm wondering if the herb used has other properties -- healing properties? I love this way of being able to ingest herbs with a little "kick"! You make it sound so delicious!

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  4. I know shisho can also benefit in anxiety or short temper, as well as prevent blood vessel hardening. I would think the liquor would share these benefits as well. I would think this would really be a great drink for the holiday season. It makes me wish I was in Japan just to give it a try.

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  5. I drank one time It was tasty. Yes Carrie when you drink it you will heal..:)

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  6. This sounds really good and different from most liqueurs.. Sometimes liquor can be too sweet but I like herbal flavors so I'd probably like Shiso liquor. I bet it could be used to make some interesting cocktails.

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  7. What an intelligent way of us herbs! Very refreshing way to quench thirst and ease your way into the evening or the pre-party festivities. Not to mention the justification of "Well it's herbs" is probably what would make this much more attractive. Then once you taste it, you're hooked.

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  8. The wonders of the East! Herbal infusions to calm and relax you that look delicious too. Will definitely have to try them!

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  9. This sounds so good and benefit your healthy and well being. Can't ask for more of a reason to drink.

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  10. I would really have to try this. Looks like a good drink and refreshing.

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  11. Sounds like a good energy drink. Would really help during the hot weather.

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  12. This sounds so much better than the American sugary, overdone concoctions. Like everything else the Japanese do -- elegant, moderate and better!!

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  13. An outstanding share! I've just forwarded this onto a colleague who has been doing a little research on this. And he actually ordered me lunch because I discovered it for him... lol. So let me reword this.... Thank YOU for the meal!! But yeah, thanks for spending some time to discuss this issue here on your web page.
    Also visit my web page : Tropical Holidays

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  14. I never knew about Shiso. Thanks for providing the info. It seems that I have to try it when I visit Japan next summer. I hope I will like it.

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  15. I never knew about Shiso. Thanks for providing the info. It seems that I have to try it when I visit Japan next summer. I hope I will like it.

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  16. I never knew about Shiso. Thanks for providing the info. It seems that I have to try it when I visit Japan next summer. I hope I will like it.

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  17. I had Shiso while in Japan but never knew the name! it has a unique taste. I think everybody should try it once. thanks for updating me.

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  18. I had Shiso while in Japan but never knew the name! it has a unique taste. I think everybody should try it once. thanks for updating me.

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  19. I had Shiso while in Japan but never knew the name! it has a unique taste. I think everybody should try it once. thanks for updating me.

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  20. Yes Ms. Julia I like Shiso!

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