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Zushi Beach

The inkwell ?   




American G.I's with their Japanese brides and babies;  The dregs of immigrants from who knows where; the smell of burnt yakitori  in the air, which somehow mixes with the sand and surf.   You can smell it on route 134 as you are approaching.   Welcome to Zushi Beach, the most American beach on Honshu and the most racially diverse crowd this side of Shonan.    Sure.  There were Japanese there also, but they blended in so well with everybody else that you could hardly tell the difference.    Could this be the new face of Japan?




Zushi Beach is alive and well though, and  people love being there.  They love the party like atmosphere and hanging out with their friends and "fuck friends" of a friend.     I was the only foreigner there.  I felt over dressed for the occasion and totally out of place.    Everybody had a tattoo and something to say.   Can't believe the Emperor of Japan has a summer villa very near here.    




Zushi Beach attracts everybody.    So could this be the new inkwell for many affluent expats?   The place where affluent non-Japanese go in the summer to enjoy the sun and surf with Japanese?  Maybe....   Or, a better word would be rainbow beach and not the inkwell, but who really knows the future?

The camaraderie was certainly there.   Folks were being so natural and paying very little attention to their surroundings.  

Dog and master enjoying that evening walk before evening.    It must be nice leaving near the beach.   I used to live near the beach.

For some,  Zushi Beach is a slice of heaven.    A place to come to be totally free from feeling foreign.    For me, it was the sails of the windsurfer that lured me here.    It was how the ocean touched the horizon and how the golden sun melted down over it.      It was the determination of each and every surfer to challenge the right wave and  staying on his board.     



 The sun's last and final throws against the cloudy sky were epic as each sail lit up exposing their unique designs.     The frequency of the tides also picked up and became stronger with each ebb and flow.     There is a beauty here and it shines through along its coast line and its views.
















The waters were a bit choppy, but these guys worked toward perfection.   They fell down and then got back up and went at it again.   


Flying butterfly men being pushed along by the gusts of wind.  
I managed to roll my pants up and go into the water.  I enjoyed feeling the water run over and through my feet.   I was wearing crogs and no socks that day so it felt really nice getting water on my feet.     Zushi Beach is a very international place to hang out and I'm sure you can meet so many diverse people, but for the purist and the anti-social, a quiet walk along Oiso Beach, a  quaint little beach just up the coast with few people is always much better.      

Comments

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  3. Now THIS is truly paradise! I would do anything to be able to live here and go to the beach every single day with my dogs. The water is PRISTINE! and the housing reminds me of Italy. Each and every person that lives around this area are the luckiest people in the world! Such beauty!

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  4. I love the insight you bring to the places and culture of Japan! Your prose is only slightly outdone by those gorgeous photos!

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  5. It looks and sounds like a place where everyone is welcome. I great place to go to and forget about the things going on in our live. Beautiful pictures as well, I bet the true site is even more gorgeous.

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  6. You take such wonderful pictures. Now I want to go windsailing! Looks like fun. This does sound more like an American-style beach.

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  7. The feeling you evoked with talking of the smell of food cooking, the rainbow of people and myriad activities going on here made me know this was a perfect summer party beach. Each to their own type of activities, opportunities to interact with a diverse group make this sound like my type of place. Let's go wading!

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  8. Interesting post since Japan is such a homogeneous society. It's interesting to see a place that is more open so people can "let their hair down".

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  9. Beautiful pictures you took. I would love to go there and get away. I just may see a vacation in the making.

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  10. A beach full of beautiful woman. Defiantly a place to go and let loose. Looks like a great time

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  11. Looks like people go there to have lots of fun and meet new friends. I would enjoy going there.

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  12. Well, I suppose one should take it in just to get the feeling of the place but, like you said, it's not for those who really love Japanese culture. The less popular beach you mentioned sounds more to my taste as well.

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  13. It is very crowded beach! When I go to japan next year I will visit.

    ReplyDelete

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